Author Topic: Washes  (Read 8852 times)

Offline PhillySniper

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Washes
« on: December 21, 2007, 01:56:48 PM »
Ok guys I need some assistance.

Can anyone tell me a good way to create a wash.\?
Can you also tell me the best way to use them? I have some peoples volunteers that are begging for a wash but i dont know how to do it......HELP!!!!!!
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Offline warzoneD

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Re: Washes
« Reply #1 on: December 21, 2007, 07:48:26 PM »
Washes are tricky.  What do you want to use them for?

In my experience they are good for fur (hair), rust on metal, sometimes for shadows on a face, and also for weathering vehicles (or terrain), but I generally avoid them and rather work from the shadow color up to the highlights.  I'm sure others will have different views. 

AFA making them - I recommend buying a premade wash, some people add water to regular paints, but again this takes a bit of practice to find the right combo and a very muddy wash can ruin a nicely painted fig.

D

Offline MadBrad

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Re: Washes
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2007, 08:02:00 PM »
Philly,

To make a good wash, start with 1 quart bourbon...

Sorry, wrong recipe!  :)

I use a mix of 50/50 water to acrylic floor wax, and put a few drops of "wash water" on my palette.  The floor wax is clear, and keeps the water in the was from "beading".   If you don't use it, your wash will tend to collect in beads, and then you end up with dark rings all over your figure, instead of a nice smooth color gradiation.

I then mix in a bit of paint, and apply a bit of the wash to my fig.  If the coverage is not heavy enough, I dab the brush in some paint adn mix that into the puddle of wash to give it more color.  I can also put a couple more drops of wash water onto the current puddle of wash to thin it out.  

I also keep a full bottle of pre-mixed black wash, because it is the most common color wash I use.  Dk Brown would be a good one to pre-mix as well for washing flesh colored portions of the fig.  

Other colored washes I just mix on the fly.  
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Offline Dr. Nick

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Re: Washes
« Reply #3 on: December 22, 2007, 01:53:53 AM »
I use a mix of 50/50 water to acrylic floor wax, and put a few drops of "wash water" on my palette.  The floor wax is clear, and keeps the water in the was from "beading".   If you don't use it, your wash will tend to collect in beads, and then you end up with dark rings all over your figure, instead of a nice smooth color gradiation.
outstanding! i need to try that.

@question: i use a japanese caligraphy-brush. it is very good to apply or reduce ink in the various cavings a fig has, and you can prevent a drop somewhere do try and leave a black place
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Offline Veez

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Re: Washes
« Reply #4 on: December 30, 2007, 07:51:27 AM »
Not to speak well of the Great Gaming Satan but GW does produce some nice inks.  Make sure you cut them with water (about 50/50) and experiment.  Like warzoneD, I also use washes for metallics, rusts, hair (especially for blonde and lt brown) and other effects (you can make an interesting glowing effect by painting the target white then washing it with a colored ink-green, blue, or red work best).
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Offline warzoneD

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Re: Washes
« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2007, 10:48:23 AM »
There's also a cool technique called "black lining" (or at least that's what is USED TO BE called) I like to use on partic. detailed figs.

With a black ink, wash or mildly watered-down paint, you trace a very thin line between objects, clothing layers, armor and skin, etc. to help separate the target from the cinnected object/layer beneath it. 

You can also used a dark shade of the same color your working with if you so choose.

Cheers.

D

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Re: Washes
« Reply #6 on: January 27, 2008, 08:19:04 PM »
http://www.wonderwashink.com/

I'm thinking about getting this product.  Show's a lot of promise.

Offline Dr. Nick

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Re: Washes
« Reply #7 on: January 28, 2008, 06:11:36 AM »
another thing is "dipping".
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~beattie/dip.html

you dip the whole fig in wash, let it drop of and correct a bit with a brush


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Offline Alpha

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Re: Washes
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2008, 07:57:58 AM »
I use washes extensively - particulary on skin (of any color). My typical method is to paint the flesh, then wash it with a darker shade. I then dry brush a couple of lighter shades...then wash it again with the original flesh color to blend it all together to look smooth and realistic. I like the look it gives.

Here's a couple of examples:





I make my washes by simply diluting my paint on a white pallette until it's a very thin consistancy....it takes a little fiddling to get it right, but you can work on a white primed figure to test it until you have a feel for what works best. I've heard using a drop of dish soap works very well with washes also - makes the wash run smoother and more even. I haven't tried it, but several pros I admire have mentioned this in their techniques...
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Offline Coil

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Re: Washes
« Reply #9 on: March 20, 2008, 12:35:46 PM »
I like Vallejo Glaze Medium for making washes. It makes it flow better and keep it a good consistency.

I've also picked up a bottle of Windsor & Newton Acrylic Flow Improver at an art store and it is really nice to use both with washes and normal paints. Makes the colour go on much smoother.

Offline warzoneD

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Re: Washes
« Reply #10 on: March 20, 2008, 11:35:19 PM »
Nice job on those figs, Alpha!

D

Offline pekulior

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Re: Washes
« Reply #11 on: March 26, 2008, 08:14:35 AM »
depending on the type of look you're going for you can make several different types of washes (inks, glazes, dips, etc etc).

I personally make most of my own because I can get the color I want and I can make a large enough batch to do an army or several armies.

Inks can be made from things like acrylic artist's ink and such. When I mix it up, I will generally add a drop of Color Float per ounce of fluid as this breaks up the surface tension of the water. I get it to the strength I need it by mixing more or less water in it. Usually the ink by itself is way too strong.

There are a couple different ways you can make a glaze. First, the traditional glaze which I've used a LOT is generally either a watered down paint (usually I thin it slightly with Future Floor Finish or Vallejo Glaze Medium) with some Color Float. Some people will also add some ink to it (GW, P3, Vallejo) to get the color they're after. It's great for flesh washes. It gives a nice effect without being too strong.

Another way to make a glaze is to use something a bit thicker than Futur Floor Finish or Vallejo Glaze Medium. I've found this stuff by Delta Ceramcoat called All Purpose Sealer. It has a good consisitancy and takes either paint or ink well. You can also get seomthing called Artists' Acrylic Medium at most of your Hobby Stores (Hobby Lobby, Robert's, Michaels, etc etc). Depending on how strong/dark you want it will vary the amount of paint/ink you add to it. For another way to do the flesh wash add about 12mL of ink or paint to a 8oz bottle. Add a drop of Color Float per ounce of liquid. Shake well and enjoy!

Now for dips! This is something most people either love or hate. It can be made by mixing Future Floor Finish with a color of paint. Most of the time, I've seen it in black as it's usually the last step done to finish a model. To make it, you'll take a bottle of Future Floor Finish and empty it into the container you'll use for your dip. After that, you'll take a well pigmented paint. I have seen things as far as Craft Paint, GW, Vallejo and even tempera paint used for this. After it's mixed, add your Color Float (1 drop per ounce, but it's not crucial to get it measured EXACTLY). Once everything is together, make sure it's mixed well. Afterwards, you have a decent quantity of dip. If you're wondering why it's called dip, it's because you dip your models in the liquid instead of painting it on. Future Floor Finish will dry to a glossy color so be sure to matte coat it once finished.

I hope this helps!

Thomas